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MedTech

Apps, gadgets, and other innovations that are advancing health and health science.

1 / Zzzz's for Athletes

diagnostic

Athletes perform better, have fewer injuries, and fewer colds if they get more rest. Now Johns Hopkins clinicians are helping interpret sleep data for Under Armour’s UA Record— a health and fitness app that pairs with the UA Band, a phone, or other tracker to record nocturnal habits. Hopkins researchers have already provided the fitness company with algorithms for detecting specific kinds of sleep disturbances, and strategies to manage them.

man sleeping
Alice Yu Deng

2 / Muscle Memory

anatomy

Athletes perform better, have fewer injuries, and fewer colds if they get more rest. Now Johns Hopkins clinicians are helping interpret sleep data for Under Armour’s UA Record— a health and fitness app that pairs with the UA Band, a phone, or other tracker to record nocturnal habits. Hopkins researchers have already provided the fitness company with algorithms for detecting specific kinds of sleep disturbances, and strategies to manage them.

leg muscle anatomy

3 / Cool Heads Prevail

emergency medicine

Reducing a patient’s body temperature during trauma helps protect the brain from damage, as this chilling effectively puts the organ into hibernation mode. With this in mind, CoolStat pumps warm, dry air in through a patient’s nose and out of his or her mouth, essentially “tricking” the body into cooling itself. The process induces mild hypothermia and cerebral cooling, and has several clinical benefits, including improving survival rates of heart attack and stroke victims. The device, based on the discoveries of a Johns Hopkins cardiologist and set for clinical trials, requires no active cooling systems or chemicals.

man breathing in the cold air
Brillianteye, Getty Images

4 / Infection Protection

infection control

One to 2 percent of people who undergo hip and knee replacements end up with surgery-related bacterial infections. Worst-case scenario: The infection lasts for months and the patient requires a new prosthesis. Johns Hopkins researchers have designed a thin, biodegradable nanofiber coating for metal hip and knee implants that can release multiple antibiotics to diminish the chance of such infections.

5 / Watch Out!

injury prevention

Tractors, cranes, and other large construction vehicles present substantial injury risk on job sites. A team of Johns Hopkins engineers has designed a prototype system that uses wireless beacons embedded in a hard hat to erase these blind spots. The beacon emits an electrical signal with a unique ID, like a lighthouse hailing its location to a passing ship. A sensor attached to construction equipment receives the signal. When workers get dangerously close to the sensor-equipped vehicle, an alarm can sound and disable the machine’s operation.

construction workers
Mark Allen Miller

6 / Heart Warning

cardiology

A new handheld device called Indicor noninvasively detects elevated filling pressure in the heart, an early warning sign of heart failure. Created by a Johns Hopkins cardiologist, Indicor records a pulse signal from an index finger as a patient blows into a small tube. The resulting output—the pressure in the left ventricle when it is filled with blood—is displayed on an iPad screen and can be transmitted wirelessly to doctors’ offices.

Indicor

7 / Crowd Sourcing

epidemiology

For patients suffering from rare forms of liver disease, finding other people with the same illness can be tough. Doctors studying these illnesses also have trouble identifying patients for their research. Liver Space, a new Facebook application dreamed up by a Johns Hopkins pediatric gastroenterologist, seeks to address these problems by linking both groups through the social networking site. A mobile version of the app is now available.

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Alice Yu Deng

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